Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

How to use Pocket to get the most out of your art

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This simple app can increase your productivity when researching and writing!

Have you ever come across an article online that really interested you but you didn’t have time to read it? Or perhaps you want to save it for a later date, so as to recall some of its content? 

My work and my degree requires a lot of researching and recalling facts, and very often I will see something online that I want to write about later. I used to save all of those articles in favourites, and then wait until I had free time and my computer available to read them, but now I don’t have to. 

Pocket, formally known as ‘Read it Later’ is a really simple web service that allows you to save articles into your own personal reading list, which is all saved in one convenient place for you to view at your convenience. 

The cool feature of this app is that it will also synchronise and download all your stored articles onto any device that you have the app installed onto, so even if you are without internet you can still catch up on all the reading you want to do. 

Saving an article to your list can be as simple as clicking on an icon in your browser (if you use chrome), but you can also email it. The service is also built into over 300 different apps, should you find content on there that you’d like to store for a later date.

Pocket has organisation features, that allow you to add tags to articles. This ‘tagging’ seems to be an increasingly popular way of sorting your files out, with Apple pushing you to tag all of your contact on Mac’s instead of the traditional folder structure. 

You can create specific tags for different categories, and that can help to structure your research should you, for example, be writing your Gold Unit 1 ‘forming a view’ piece. When I wrote mine, which is available to read here, I did a lot of research into the record label industry, and some articles were really long. I used pocket to dip in and out of them as and when I needed to, and they were synced across all my devices so I could continue reading and making notes wherever I was. 

The service also allows you to archive and favourite things you have added previously, meaning that you can retain those article gems you have found online, without it clogging up your current reading list. I’ve done this with quite a few articles that I thought were utter gems.

I hope to write more long form, in-depth articles that can really get into the specifics of particular topics for Voice this year, and I know that many people will not have the time to read it in one go. Pocket would be a fantastic way to save those for later. Equally, many of our readers are creating fantastic pieces that require more time and attention to really appreciate, and I’ve used Pocket often to read them while travelling on the underground where signal is poor. 

To give you an idea of how much I love Pocket, and how frequently I use it, this is an email they sent me at the end of last year:

So if you love reading online but never have the time, I would really recommend Pocket as the way to do it. Below are all the links you will need to get started, with many happy hours of reading ahead.

How to save articles on devices

Email: http://help.getpocket.com/customer/portal/articles/482759

Chrome app: http://getpocket.com/welcome?ep=1

300 different apps: http://getpocket.com/apps/?ep=1

How to view on devices

Kobo: http://help.getpocket.com/customer/portal/articles/1299217-connecting-pocket-to-kobo

Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ideashower.readitlater.pro

iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/app/read-it-later-pro/id309601447?mt=8

Browser: https://getpocket.com/login?e=2

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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