Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Review of the Science Museum

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For those who love to know how things work, or why things are, this is the place to be!

I remember the first time I went to the Science Museum, I was 6 years old and it was with my best friend who lived in London. At that point I was just content with playing in the children’s area in the basement. The second time I went was for a different friend’s birthday party. We actually slept in the museum, made plasticine, experienced the IMAX, ignited hydrogen and watched them freeze objects with liquid nitrogen. Then there was my third time, which was this year.

Officially, I went because it was my girlfriend’s birthday. Unofficially I went because I love the Science Museum, and it allows me to cast back to a time where I wanted to be a scientist, and know everything about everything. The Science Museum acts as a small reminder of this time, before I had to grow up and face reality.

So, behind this very honest reflection is a review of the Science Museum, and if you hadn’t guessed, I definitely think it is worth a visit.

The building is huge, and really impressive, even as you just walk in. Entry is free, but you are encouraged to donate so you can keep the place open and able to provide you with exciting exhibits and workshops. As you past the desk and reach the first exhibition you are faced with this huge glowing ring suspended above you. It is awesome to look at but I never found out what it was for. If you visit maybe you could find out and post a comment to tell me?

The science museum spans over several floors, and covers lots of topics, for example, space, technology, medicine, and the environment, to name just a few. There is loads of great interactive areas within the museum, all of which help to make science feel more real, and more engaging.

Workshops are offered on a range of topics for children of different age groups. Costs vary and the workshop themes change all the time so it is worth looking up every so often. I remember from my own experiences that they are a lot of fun and educational at the same time.

Unfortunately my visit was cut short by a fire alarm, but not before I learnt a valuable lesson about doing as i’m told and not letting my curious side take over. There was one exhibit which had a sign telling us not to touch it. An screen offered additional information telling us that touching it would give us an electric shock. I didn’t believe it, promptly touched it and, true to the sign was shocked. Apparently it was to demonstrate how people will be tempted to touch it, despite being told not to, as it offers unpredictability in a safe museum environment. I advice you not to touch the pole, but certainly check out the rest of the museum!

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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