Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Google Chrome Experiments: Exploring the capabilities of the internet

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In my recent jaunt over to much loved Science Museum I was shocked to find that within the bowels of the goliath building there was a section cordoned off exclusively for Google Chrome. Being a huge fan of the company, and some of the amazing quality products they release (my Nexus 4 included), and the research they conduct into new technology fields, I just had to venture inside and see what was going on.

It turns out I had previously heard of the display, just never really registered what I was reading. This may have been because at the time I didn’t live in London so never believed I’d get to see it. That aside, this is a sponsored Google area, where they show off some of the fantastic uses for science and technology. Upon entry you collect a card with a unique pattern on. This is inserted into the kiosk at each of the different experiment stations, and it allows you to save all of the work you produce at any of it’s 5 different stations.

The purpose of the exhibition is to demonstrate the workings and capabilities of the internet, providing information as to how it actually operates. While this is not directly related to art, the potentials for overspill into the art world are obvious, and demonstrated by Google. One of the work stations have you interacting with instruments by dragging dots on a screen to form patterns, which then correspond to certain notes. While the pattern based music system is not new, it is one of many ways in which technology and art can amalgamate, symbolising an ambitious future of internet/real life fusion projects, like an internet powered phantom piano, even if it only worked temperamentally in its trial. Another one takes a picture of your face, and then proceeds to saturate it, find the outlines, and draw it in the sand. You can watch the sketchbot draw my face in the video above.

The special thing about the this exhibition is that you don’t have to go to the Science Museum to see it. It would be nonsensical to promote all the workings of the internet if you were unable to view and interact with this project online, and that is exactly what you can do. Providing you have access to the internet, and a computer with a half decent processor, you are able to interact with the stations that are present within the exhibition, showcasing the ability to truly harness the internet in the cause of productivity and inclusivity. That is why the one-of-a-kind exhibition is so important in the turning tide of technology and social interaction.  Check out the video below for more information, or if you want to get involved straight away then visit the website now. http://www.chromeweblab.com/

 

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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