Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

From the vault: ‘Parachutes’ – Coldplay [Album]

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Where to start? This has to be up there as one of my most favourite albums of ALL TIME! Everything about it is constructed perfectly. Beautifully, with a sense of melancholy, which still subtly plays with hope and love, it’s amazing.

Excited rant over, let me explain why this should be one for the immediate (legal) download list.

This is where is all began. Coldplay’s first album and it catapulted them into media attention. Their moody and atmospheric roots are all present here, and personally something I wish they returned to when listening to their still impressive Mylo Xyloto.

The album opens with ‘Don’t panic’, an alternative version to the one released on ‘The Blue Room’, their EP released in 1999. The acoustic guitars start quietly, growing in volume before accompanied by vocals and drums. It sends shivers down my spine. ‘Shiver’ incidentally is the next track, and a complete change in tempo and mood.

This is the album that offered the world the now iconic songs ‘Trouble’ and ‘Yellow’, which I actually think is one of the weaker songs on the album. It just never really seems to start. That being said, watching it live was simply incredible, and something that will stay with me forever.

Underrated songs on the album include the title track ‘Parachutes’ and ‘We Never Change’, both lyrically haunting, and lead with strong acoustic guitars. The music is perfect for reflecting to, and not at all suitable for a party.

In my music library of nearly 90GB, the Parachutes album is one of the most played, indicating it’s significance to me

The last listed song is the incredibly uplifting, ‘Everything’s not lost’.  It envelops you, seemingly entering your very soul, if such a thing exists, and warms you up. Then, as if the album hasn’t spoilt you enough, there is a hidden track – ‘Life is for living’. Organ driven, the song is equally brilliant in the lyric department.

There are people who really bash Coldplay, be it for their seemingly pretentious attitude, or feel their music is ‘samey’. I challenge those people, and those who haven’t heard Coldplay before, or those who have heard of Coldplay but maybe only their Viva la Vida work onwards, to get online, or head to your nearest music store, and buy this absolutely beautiful, gleaming gem of British music. Dim the lights, turn off your phone for the 44 minutes, and just listen.

 

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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