Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Is technology advancing or damaging art?

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Feedback is on a global level, and instantaneous. The verbal discussion can still occur on numerous platforms, as can lessons.

There have been arguments that this digital age is reducing the youth into nothing more than zombies. Mindlessly typing ‘lolz’ to another colourful cat picture, the youth are supposedly no longer going outside and no longer visiting arts exhibitions. Is the opinion that we don’t leave the warmth and light of our screens a fallacy? Opting to give a virtual thumbs up over a discussing a play in candlelight, does this make young people unable to appreciate art?

I argue it doesn’t, and instead the internet is a modern platform for art, something renowned for its evolutionary nature. Art in the traditional form, drawings and photographs, are still being viewed, but instead of being hosted in a particular gallery for a limited time, they can all be hosted online, indefinitely, and be seen by a much larger audience. The internet creates opportunity for the small, unknown artists to create their own gallery, and grow on their own terms.

The physical art forms are similarly benefitting from the digital era. Dance videos can attract millions of views in mere hours, and having an online portfolio does wonders for career prospects, as it allows employers to quickly see your talents.

Feedback is on a global level, and instantaneous. The verbal discussion can still occur on numerous platforms, as can lessons.

I once fancied learning the drums, and the amount of videos at my disposal on the internet was amazing. I would never have paid for lessons, so to get them free off YouTube was incredible.

I know of numerous people being inspired by the works of others, viewed online,  demonstrating how it can in fact enhance art participation and involvement.

For those fearing a decline in the brick and mortar establishments then worry no more. Companies like Google have started mapping out museums, allowing virtual tours around the building (http://www.googleartproject.com/en-gb/), raising awareness of these fantastic structures and increasing the likelihood of visiting in the future.

Technology advancement is inevitable, and I personally feel that it is better that it be embraced and utilised by artists globally, instead of viewed as something to staunchly oppose, for it offers many real life benefits.

What do you think? Is the Internet really on the way to destroying art as we appreciate it, or is there potential for the Internet to expand our own perception and exposure to art?

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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