Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Red Dwarf X review

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The 4th October saw a personal all time favourite TV show resurrected, but does it hold the same charm as the classic shows of 14 years ago?

The night finally came, the release of a new series of the programme which founded my childhood. First aired in 1988, 4 years before I was even born, Red Dwarf picked up a cult following of people, who watched it right up until it’s ultimately catastrophic and cliffhanger ending 8th series in 1999.

Dave picked it up, releasing a mini-series in 2009 to test the waters for considering a new series, and the results were positive enough to commission a new series. The first episode of that series aired on the 4th October, with high anticipation.

While I have not yet gaged the response from the internet, personally I feel that season X returns to the old formula present in season 1-4, before it became “monster of the week”, and focusing too heavily on the visual effects.

To watch the new series reminded me how creative and brilliant British television can be. In an age where US sitcoms dominate the viewing guide, to have something longstanding and from the UK is refreshing.

Red Dwarf was classed as pioneering in its day, and an essence of that original spark was visible. I found myself becoming completely emerged in the show, but this was broken by the presence of adverts. These completely took me by surprise, having always watched Red Dwarf either on the BBC or on VHS/DVD (old school). The very fact I didn’t consider adverts suggests the new series doesn’t deviate at all from the brilliance of the old.

I fully recommend those who loved series such as Firefly, or Spaced. Let’s just hope the rest of the series is as great!

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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