Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

The Confessions of Gordon Brown review

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Political knowledge not necessarily required to enjoy this fabricated look into our previous Prime Minister

As a student of politics, I felt I should go and enjoy something relevant to my course and expected future career. This peek into the thoughts of Gordon Brown was a great way to satisfy this need.

While I don’t know the factual accuracy of this script, it is completely what one would expect to be running through his head. It had the temper and the genuine, honest desire for change. It had the challenge to meet the wants of “southland”, the middle class England who live in the south and expect the best of their lives and the advancement of their children.

It also had all the bottled rage at Tony Blair and Alistair Campbell we all suspected he harboured and even addressed ‘bigot-gate’ – the amusing slip up which proved to be a PR disaster.

While it was turgid at times, and the room was sweltering hot, Ian Grieve managed to captivate and ensnare the audience in his hour long soliloquy, even though one of the stage crew was audibly snoring behind the curtain.

See if you are interested in politics or if you are interested in the potentially truthful thoughts of politicians within Downing Street. ***

The Pleasance Courtyard (0131 556 6550) until Aug 26.

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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