Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Dirty Great Love Story Review

D

The poetry driven love drama of two 30 somethings who are unable to see what’s right in front of them. 

This show came recommended to me, and like all events that cone recommended to me, I do no research into them so i can avoid forming pre-conceptions, and then suitably lambast or praise the recommender after viewing.

There will be no lambasting the advisor in this instance. The show was watched in the main theatre tent of Latitude festival on a sunny, dusty Sunday afternoon. The crowd was a surprisingly upbeat but undoubtedly tired throng of left wing middle class. The stage, blue wash with two bar stools on. The performers, male and female, young and professional.

The lights shone bright as the two introduce their piece, a story of Katie and Richard; two thirty somethings who shared a drunken encounter.  The drama comes from their continued meetings due to a variety of circumstances, but being blind to the feelings they shared, and the future they deserve together.

The play follows them through two years of their lives in a wonderfully crafted hour long piece,  delivered all in rhyme, and excellent comedic timing. The two meet in a club, one on a stag do, the other on a hen-night, the latter recovering from a break up, the former; a bespectacled nerd.

Music cues were timed to perfection, bringing in classics from The Smiths, to modern day music. Sound effects used sparingly to increase impact. The two performers managed to play multiple characters in a fashion which both advanced the story and left the audience with a very clear idea of how they perceive themselves, and interact with others. It was surprisingly in depth considering the sparse nature of the layout.

I liken this piece to Shakespeare for the 21st Century. It has all the crucial elements, the love story, the drama, the comedy, the poetry, and the love of the audience. The applause was raucous and well deserved. The fact they managed to do the whole hour, in rhyme, without a break, and no slip ups is testimony to the professionalism and capabilities of actors. It’s something I don’t always consider, but in such a raw, barebones performance you are forced, rightly so, to appreciate the writing and acting capabilities.

I cannot recommend this show enough to those of you who like enjoying yourselves.

About the author

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

Tom Inniss Journalist and podcaster

Tom Inniss

Tom is a journalist and feature writer with interests in politics, technology and culture. He currently works as the editor of Voice - an online magazine for young people interested in art and culture.

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